Little One

February 9th - 13th, 2016
Previews Feb 9th 7pm & Feb 10th 1pm PWYC Wed-Fri 8pm | Sat 4pm & 8pm | Wed 1pm PWYC
Post Performance Panel Discussion Feb 11 *

Daniel Arnold and Marisa Smith.  Photography by Kaarina Venalainen.

Daniel Arnold and Marisa Smith. Photography by Kaarina Venalainen.

Produced by Alley Theatre

The company that produced last season’s Kayak, brings us a suspenseful psycho-drama by “Canada’s hottest young playwright” (Globe and Mail, National Post, Now Magazine). When 4-year-old Claire is adopted into the family, 6-year-old Aaron has to learn to “love” his new monster of a sister. Told through the now adult voices of its two main characters, Little One weaves stories of childhood horror and teenage humiliation into a twisted, wryly funny, and ultimately haunting narrative.

Written By Hannah Moscovitch (East of Berlin, The Russian Play)

Directed by Amiel Gladstone (Craigslist Cantata, Are We Cool Now?)
Featuring Daniel Arnold (Any Night, The Romeo Initiative) and
Marisa Smith (Kayak, Problem Child)
Lighting Design by Adrian Muir
Sound Design by Brian Linds

* Free: Post Performance Panel Discussion Feb 11th

Themed around child protection and family welfare, be sure to join us for what is bound to be an enlivened discussion following Hannah Moscovitch’s modern, Canadian psychological drama.

Discussion will be moderated by Janet Smith (Arts Editor, Georgia Straight)

Panellists in attendance will include:

Natalie Clark, Chair of Field Education at UBC School of Social Work

Carol Ross, Recently retired Child Welfare Committee Chair of the BC Association of Social Workers

Laura Dosanjh, Clinical Counsellor at the Centre for Creative Counselling

Naomi Kolinsky, Clinical Counsellor at Well Woman Counselling

Lara Wease, Child and Family Therapist and adoptive parent

Press for Little One

“Little One is at once deeply poetic and unnerving, a meditation on sibling relationships, the nature of love and the dark horror of upper middle class existence that is ’90s suburban life.”
– HuffingtonPost.com

“Frequently witty, pocket-sized horror story…prods us into laughter between our shocked gasps.”
-Time Out New York

 “A gorgeously creepy, darkly funny two-hander… This excellent company makes every moment count.
-New York Times

This production is riveting throughout … deeply disturbing but laced with humour and surprising twists.
–The Georgia Straight

“Overall Excellence Award Winner” (New York Fringe)

“CRITIC’S PICK”
– Time Out, New York

“Little One delivers huge. A great story, two fantastic performances…Daniel Arnold, as Aaron, is quite simply amazing. If you can get tickets, go see this now.”- whatsonoffbroadway.com

“Both actors are impossibly good…a tremendously insightful play. It doesn’t get any better than this.”
curtainup.com

“A sheer delight … tremendously talented actors. A macabre, well-layered script … packed with humour. Will leave you transformed – guaranteed.”
– Vancouverscape

“As riveting and polished as a Fringe show ever gets. Smith and Arnold have worked magic together before and they take it to a new level in Little One. It’s ‘one’ to see.”
– Jo Ledingham, Vancouver Courier

“Absolutely chilling … showcases fine writing and terrific acting in elegantly theatrical ways … as in the best stories, not everything is at it seems.”
– Jerry Wasserman, The Province

“Little One is quintessential modern theatre. The performances are absolutely terrific … wonderful direction by Amiel Gladstone. Make sure to catch it.”
– Mobtreal.com

“Performers Marisa Smith and Daniel Arnold really nail it. Deeply creepy … with plenty of uneasy laughs along the way.”
– Montreal Gazette

“The Must-See Show of the Fringe. Such a compelling and boldly intense show. This 60-minute edge-of-your-seat psychological thriller… will continue to haunt you, long after you have left the theatre.”
– FunFunVancouver

“A harrowing tale … a kinetic atmosphere that maintains an unbalanced edge. The acting is superb. What is disturbing about it is the believability of it all. I had to double check to see who wrote the play so believable was Arnold that I thought it was his story. Smith captures the logic and emotional inabilities of a mentally disturbed child flawlessly. It delivers such an impact.”
– MJ Ankenman, Plank Magazine